Please don’t dis the Baby Jesus


Can I say it? Merry Christmas!

If my honest use of the word “Christmas” has not caused you to wither away in disgust, then stick with me a bit longer. I have watched, with great amusement, the debate over the use of the word Christmas during the last few weeks. What I have to say may surprise you.

I don’t have a problem with stores greeting customers with the phrase “Happy Holidays”. I just don’t find it offensive. It’s dishonest, but not offensive. Let me ‘splain this one to you Lucy.

A lot of people celebrate holidays during this time of year. Christians, as you may have heard, celebrate the Christmas holiday (which stands for Holy Day). Our Jewish neighbors celebrate Hanukkah during this time of year. It’s a beautiful holiday celebrating a miracle of the same God we share. Our Muslim neighbors have a holiday. For all I know, atheists may celebrate Nothingmas and sing non-sectarian carols all the Newdow day. It doesn’t matter. It’s just good business to issue a blanket greeting to someone when they enter your store.

However, let’s be honest with ourselves. The whole argument is a stunt designed to get attention from a populace that has the collective attention span of a moth. What was I saying? Oh yeah.

I’d give all of the money in my pocket (a quarter, by the way) to have been in the meeting where the politically correct dufus announced that his store would sell “holiday trees” this year. I don’t want this to sound insensitive (yes I do), but they are called Christmas trees. No other Holy Day celebration involves putting lights and shiny things on a fake tree in your living room. Calling your Christmas trees “holiday trees” isn’t insulting to Christians – of which I am one – it is insulting to all of your customers to presume they are impressed by such shallow political correctness.

I’m not asking anyone to be disrespectful. Be honest with your customers. When they get out of their cars and they see the green and red decorations around your store, they know you are saying “holiday” and meaning “Christmas”. When they see the fat guy in the red suit, they don’t think he’s Hanukkah Harry. When they enter your store and the muzak is playing holiday carols, they figure out pretty quick that those are not Buddha ballads or Solstice Songs. They are Christmas carols.

Christmas is big business. Why else would malls start decorating for Christmas right after the 4th of July every year? I live in Alabama. It’s a pretty place but I cannot relate to dashing through the snow when it is still 85 degrees outside on a cold day. Obviously there is a financial reward to the holiday season.

Be honest with your customers. If you want to be inclusive to other traditions – and you should – then do something to attract people from other traditions if it is advantageous to your business. This is a free market society (sort of) after all. But if you are gearing up for the Christmas season, decorating for the Christmas season, and hoping to make most of your sales for the year during the Christmas season – then admit that you celebrate the Christmas season. Your customers know what the trees are for and they are not offended. 😉

America is the world’s only true melting pot culture. That’s what makes us great. We can respect different beliefs and still be united under one flag. We don’t need wishy washy symbolism and politically correct nonsense to act as the self esteem police to shield us from other ideas. What we need is a little common sense. If you ask your customers to spend their money with you for Christmas, then don’t pretend it isn’t Christmas. if you don’t want to acknowledge Christmas, then don’t decorate for it, don’t advertise for it, and don’t accept profits from it. Simple enough.

Americans of every background would appreciate the honesty.

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8 thoughts on “Please don’t dis the Baby Jesus

  1. Great post. While there have long been holidays celebrating the winter solstice, like Roman Saturnalia, the modern day celebration is for Christmas. Pretending otherwise is doublespeak and insulting. Many companies today (mine is one) warn against saying “Merry Christmas” and scare everyone into the innoculous “Happy Holidays” greeting as if gift-giving in December is a Hindu practice. Ostensibly, the intent is not to insult those who don’t celebrate Christmas. But if that’s the case, why do we wish them a Happy Holiday that they don’t celebrate?

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  2. Shana and I were discussing the canned music in our office building. “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” had been converted into a plethora of voices singing in staccato “Ha ha ha ppy Ho ho li daaaaays”. It took me awhile to figure out what the song was. They eventually came around to the familiar tune except now the words were “We Wish you Happy Holidays”. What I find interesting is many people come to America and want to change it to be like their native country on Freedom. Like Freedom is a drug. I certainly understand people wanting freedom, but come and enjoy what we have. Learn to communicate with us. Be a part of our neighborhoods. Follow our laws. Enjoying our traditions. Most importantly do not force us to give up ours. Mostly the liberals are creating this generic winter holiday, supposedly to avoid offending anyone, but they are offending all with any intelligence. It is all about control, keeping people down on the farm and keeping them grateful for the handouts so they will continue to vote to keep the liberals in office. The Christmas brouhaha is all part of the same scheme.

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  3. maalgo, I don’t have a problem with the generic greeting because you don’t know if the person celebrates the same tradition you celebrate, but they almost assuredly celebrate a holiday whether secular or religious. I don’t think I’ve ever met an atheist who refused a paid day off and insisted on working on Dec. 25. However, we can use this opportunity to get to know one another by embracing our traditions and respecting the traditions of others instead of trying to mix them all into one secular politically correct waste of time. I recall a coworker from a place where we both spent some time in our careers asking a British coworker what he was planning to do for the 4th of July. Sure, he was getting the day off, but that doesn’t mean he celebrates the reason. A lot of the poltically correct nonsense is based in ignorance of the cultures of others. Hey, send me a Hanukkah card, or any greeting you want from any holiday you celebrate. I would appreciate the idea that you thought to wish me well in your time of celebration. I wouldn’t be offended that my beliefs were different than your beliefs. I’ll email you my address if you wish to send me your saturnalia greetings. 🙂

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  4. Sleepwriter,Like you, I don’t have a problem with the generic greeting. However, I do have a problem with my company banning me from saying “Merry Christmas” to practicing Christians that work for me. I say it anyway. I agree with embracing different cultures. I’ve been to mosques throughout the Arab world, synagogues in Israel, Buddhist temples throughout Southeast Asia and Japan, pagan temples to Dionysus, Isis, Ra, … heck, I’ve even been to Starbucks! But just as I follow all the appropriate customs and dress of those places of worship, I don’t believe I should be stopped from saying, “Merry Christmas.”

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  5. Terry, good thoughts. You’ve helped me focus on the issue myself.Personally, I am not offended by a non-christian wishing me happy holidays. I am offended by a christian doing it, because they’re denying their reason for the season.The fact is that when someone wishes me a Happy Holidays, they’re either confirming me what they are (a mission field) or what they’re not (on the role that’s called up yonder). Either way, this who the guy for which CHRISTmas is named came to save.Merry CHRISTmas to ALL!

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